For nonarteritic transient monocular visual loss, treat the patient as if they had a transient ischemic attack with antiplatelet therapy and a same-day evaluation for large vessel disease and cardioembolic sources.

Retinal vein occlusion.

It may affect one or both eyes and all or part of a visual field. 5.

Topics discussed include temporal arteritis, optic neuritis.

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3. Patients typically present with profound, acute, painless monocular visual loss—with 80% of affected indi­viduals having a final visual acuity of counting fingers or worse. The features of.

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For all episodes or to claim CME credit for. It typically describes a reduction in visual acuity. .

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Acute monocular visual loss is an alarming symptom for the patient and the emergency physician.

In typical cases, painful, monocular visual loss evolves over several hours to a few days. Varied use of common terminology may cause some confusion when reading the literature.

. Decide on best medical/surgical means of stroke prevention.

Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is an ocular emergency.
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Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 2012. . The goal of this review is to describe the most current understanding of the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders.

. Acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) should be treated as an. We summarize the key components of a comprehensive evaluation and management of patients presenting with cerebral and retinal TIA. . . Localize the symptoms 4.

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Early assessment of the presence or absence of associated symptoms such as pain, double vision, and flashes and/or floaters is also. Temporal onset of vision loss.

The authors describe the case of a 32year-old man who presented with acute painless visual loss in the left eye.

Anita Kohli and Amanda Redfern discuss how to approach the patient who presents with transient monocular vision loss.

It may affect one or both eyes and all or part of a visual field.

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